Author Archives: Dr. Hill

Assistant Professor of Psychology
Utah Valley University

HPL/BaCN Student Researchers are Presenting!

Congratulations to Keifer Weiland and Josh Brown! Keifer will be presenting his project, Is the pen mightier than the keyboard?: Assessing whether distinct types of note-taking influence retention, at the 30th Annual National Council on Undergraduate Research Conference in Asheville, NC.  Josh will be presenting his project, Evaluating fashion fluency, at the 28th Association for Psychological Science Annual Conference in Chicago, IL. We are tremendously proud of both of them!

Dr. Jeremy Boden, Family Studies

Name: Jeremy Boden 

Department: Behavioral Science 

 

Q: What is your research focus? 

JB: Transition to Sexual Activity in Married Couples 

 

Q: What current research projects are you working on, if any?  

JB: I’m currently working on a Phase III of our Transition to Sexual Activity Project. We are writing up our third IRB to submit soon. We are looking to study couples (who reported to be sexually abstinent prior to marriage) pre- and post-wedding to get a better and more proximal shot of their transition to sexual activity.  

 

Q: What are your goals with these projects?  

JB: 

1. Understand the predictors and protective factors for couples going into this major developmental transition that will sustain them short- and long-term.  

2. To use the date to create a family life education program for premarital couples 

3. To provide a rich research opportunity for undergraduate students to develop and carryout meaningful and applied research and to provide opportunities to present at local, regional, and/or national conferences. 

 

Q: What other research interests do you have?   

JB: None 

 

Q: What opportunities are available to UVU students who would like to get involved in research? 

JB: We have a very small team but new research team members are welcome to talk with me about their aspirations and interests. 

 

Q: Currently, or in the near future (if so, please provide an availability date), are you available to facilitate research opportunities with students? 

JB: It is possible in spring 2016.  

 

Q: What advice do you have for undergraduate students? (research, grad school, building  relationships with teachers, etc.) 

JB: If you are interested in graduate school in the social sciences, just get involved in any research project, even if it doesn’t completely interest you. 

Dr. Matt Draper, Psychology

Name: Dr. Matthew Draper 
Department: BESC/Psychology 
 
Q: What is your research focus?  
MD: Theoretical and philosophical psychology. 
  
Q: What current research projects are you working on, if any?  
MD: Mormonism and Perfectionism/Pornography use, religious trauma, racism, grace and psychotherapy 
  
Q: What are your goals with these projects?  
MD: To develop and share new theoretical perspectives via publication and presentation. 
  
Q: What other research interests do you have?   
MD: Spirituality, sexuality, Christian and LDS Theology and psychology, phenomenology and psychology, etc. 
  
Q: What opportunities are available to UVU students who would like to get involved in research?  
MD: None or lots, depending. For people who are creative and who roll up their sleeves and get involved there’s no end of opportunities. For timid people who want to be given something to do, then very little. 
  
Q: Currently, or in the near future (if so, please provide an availability date), are you available to facilitate research opportunities with students? 
MD: Our research team meets at 3pm on Fridays. 
  
Q: What advice do you have for undergraduate students? (research, grad school, building relationships with teachers, etc.)  
MD: There is always room at the top, and it’s a long trip there. Don’t go alone.

Dr. Kris Doty, Social Work

Name:  Kris Doty 

Department:  Behavioral Science 

Emphasis: Social Work
 


 

Q: What is your research focus?:

KD: LDS social issues (perfectionism, depression, early returning missionaries) 

Q: What current research projects are you working on, if any?   

KD: I am writing up studies I have completed during the past year. 

Q: What are your goals with these projects?   

KD: Get three articles out by the end of the academic year. 

Q: What other research interests do you have?   

KD: Program evaluation, welfare reform 

Q: What opportunities are available to UVU students who would like to get involved in research?   

KD: I typically have students work heavily with me on my projects from conception to publication.   

Q: Currently, or in the near future (if so, please provide an availability date), are you available to facilitate research opportunities with students?   

KD: Either Fall or Spring 2017 I will start the next project on interviewing former mission presidents to ascertain their experiences working with ERMs. 

Q: What advice do you have for undergraduate students? (research, grad school, building relationships with teachers, etc.)   

KD: Do your reading, avoid complaining, and avoid texting in class to show you are a serious student. Make good relationships with faculty by seeing them during office hours.  Don’t suck up – we see through that instantly.  Find joy in the academic journey and take good care of yourself by not overloading your life and schedule.  

Dr. Leo Schlosnagle, Psychology

Name: Leo Schlosnagle

Department: Behavioral Science/Psychology

Q: What is your research focus?

LS: Judgment, decision making, health and human development

Q: What current research projects are you working on, if any?

LS:

1. Effects of traumatic brain injury on judgment and decision making
2. Biases in perceptions of the likelihood of experiencing disability and health problems
3. Development of a measure to assess perceptions of the likelihood of experiencing disability
4. Judgment and decisions to pursue human services careers
5. Perceptions of people with disability and health problems
6. Sleep, health, memory and decision making of parents of children with special healthcare needs
7. Social interactions, interpersonal problems and social decisions among young and older adults

Q: What are your goals with these projects?

LS: Each project is at a different stage and has different goals. For example, some projects are currently being designed, whereas others are being written into manuscripts to (hopefully) be published. All projects are open to involvement by UVU students, but each provides experience in a different aspect of research (e.g.; data collection, analysis, writing, etc.).

Q: What other research interests do you have?

LS: Stereotyped judgment and decision making; biases and fallacies in decision making; judgment, decision making and religiosity, impulsive decision making

Q: What opportunities are available to UVU students who would like to get involved in research?

LS: Opportunities include (but are not limited to) involvement in the design of original research, preparing literature reviews, data collection, management and analysis, involvement in the writing of research posters and manuscripts, and involvement in presenting research at conferences. The specific tasks a student completes depends on the interests and learning goals of the student. Also, the degree of involvement depends on the student—some students with flexible schedules may choose to devote considerable time to research activities, others may choose less involvement (although I generally require students to be available for at least 3 hours per week).

Q: Currently, or in the near future (if so, please provide an availability date), are you available to facilitate research opportunities with students?

LS: Yes—all of my research projects are currently available for student involvement and new projects will be added.

Q: What advice do you have for undergraduate students? (research, grad school, building relationships with teachers, etc.)

LS: First, “Try before you buy”; that is—get hands-on experience with whatever it is you think you want to do before you commit to a graduate program focused on that topic. For instance, if you think you want to be a counselor, get involved in opportunities to try counseling first-hand before you apply to a graduate program in counseling.

Second, once you know which career you’d like to pursue, find mentors who are experienced and accomplished in that particular field. Keep in mind that these mentors may be accomplished professionals, but they may also be fellow students. One of my most important mentors was my graduate advisor—a tenured professor. However, one of my other most important mentors was a graduate student who was only a couple years older than myself. My advisor helped me understand how to conduct research, whereas having a mentor who was a fellow student helped me understand how to navigate and succeed in graduate school.

Dr. Barton Poulson, Psychology

Q: What is your research focus?

BP: Data Science Training and Service (data science is essentially the combination of statistics and computer programming in applied settings)

Q: What current research projects are you working on, if any?

BP: 

1. I am developing a wide range of tutorials and courses on data science to be delivered online
2. I run an annual event in the spring that provides opportunities for hands-on service over two days analyzing data from local nonprofits. (This event was previously called the “Utah Data Dive” but, from now on, will be the “Data Science Charrette.”)
3. I frequently prepare presentations for conferences and events for professional data scientists. (These are not academic conferences but events for working professionals, which are much more fun.)

Q: What are your goals with these projects?

BP: My goal is to help as many people as possible learn to work creatively and constructively with data. The defining characteristic that separates data science from statistics is that the data do not fit neatly into an Excel spreadsheet or an SPSS file. Instead, creative solutions are needed to even get the data into workable format, and then analyses need to be tailored to a client’s specific needs, as opposed to standard academic research practices. (See more at my website, datalab.cc.)

Q: What other research interests do you have?

BP: I also have a great interest in art, design, music, and so on. I had a UVU Presidential Fellowship for Faculty Scholarship to create methods for live video looping in modern dance performances. I have also created dance related pieces for Repertory Dance Theatre, a professional, modern dance company in Salt Lake City, and created gallery pieces. I did this work primarily in Processing (an open-source, Java-based programming language; see processing.org) and in Max/MSP/Jitter (a graphical programming language used primarily for music; see cycling74.com). You can see more on this work at my website danceandcode.com. I am also interested in electronic music and have some experience working in Ableton Live. I am currently advising a UVU student on a project about “fashion fluency” for men’s fashion.

Q: What opportunities are available to UVU students who would like to get involved in research?

BP:

1. If you have your own art/music/design related ideas, I’d be happy to talk with you and potentially advise you on them.
2. I need students to help in many roles for the Data Science Charrette. This includes finding nonprofit organizations, helping coordinate work, running the event, etc.
3. I would love to collaborate with students on preparing and presenting talks at professional data science events. Again, these are not academic events but, rather, are extraordinary professional opportunities.

Q: Currently, or in the near future (if so, please provide an availability date), are you available to facilitate research opportunities with students?

BP: Yes, a limited amount on the topics above.

Q: What advice do you have for undergraduate students? (research, grad school, building relationships with teachers, etc.)

BP: My work over the last five years has been mostly outside of regular academic research and it’s been the best, most rewarding, most useful, most fun work that I’ve ever done. While I do have a PhD (in social and personality psychology) and I am a full-time professor, I strongly suggest that people take a very careful look at life outside of academia before making the major commitment to grad school. An undergraduate degree in behavioral science is a great general-purpose background for a huge number of personal and professional opportunities. No matter what track you take, though, you would be wise to create a digital portfolio that shows not only what you have learned but, much more importantly, what you can DO and how well you can do it. (I have my own at bartonpoulson.com.) And don’t restrict yourself to just behavioral science topics in your portfolio. You’re a person with broad interests and abilities and your portfolio should reflect that.

Dr. Chris Anderson, Psychology

Name: Chris Anderson

Department: Behavioral Science


Q: What is your research focus?

CA: Health Psychology/Behavioral Medicine, Pedagogy

Q: What current research projects are you working on, if any?

CA: Currently I am working to develop a questionnaire related to weight management practices for use by health care providers to help patients reach goals. I am planning on converting the questionnaire into an app to help individuals with long-term behavioral patterns to manage their weight status. Other current projects focus on reducing obesity stigma, negative emotions during weight loss, and behavioral associations with weight gain.

I am also researching topics within Pedagogy (the method and practice of teaching) such as practices for high-achieving classes, mentoring new adjunct faculty members, and the predictors of student satisfaction with instructors and courses.

Q: What opportunities are available to UVU students who would like to get involved in research?

CA: I currently have space for a few new students to become involved in research endeavors who could devote 2+ hours a week to research–students who can help with literature reviews would be preferred.

Q: Currently, or in the near future (if so, please provide an availability date), are you available to facilitate research opportunities with students?

CA: As stated above, I currently would have space for a few new students.

Q: What advice do you have for undergraduate students? (research, grad school, building relationships with teachers, etc.)

CA: It seems to me that many students pursuing graduate school don’t fully see the “big picture” of the graduate school admission process. That is, graduate school admission committees don’t just look at an applicant’s GPA—they look at research experience, letters of recommendation, G.P.A., GRE scores, social skills, work experience, and the goodness of fit between the applicant’s goals and the program’s goals. Despite this, it seems students devote 90% of their energy towards their GPA and just 10% towards the other important factors (I was guilty of this myself as an undergraduate). Consequently, I recommend students devote more energy towards research, working with faculty members so they can receive better letters of recommendation, researching graduate school programs, and preparing for the GRE.

Regarding building relationships with instructors I’d recommend that students be courteous and respectful of the professor’s time—notice when their office hours are and set up appointments to meet during those times. When working with professors on research teams be reliable and do what you say you’re going to do and don’t be late on your deadlines. Overall you’ll want to show that you are a good person to work with so they can confidently recommend you to a graduate program as a person they will want to be around for the next few years.

Dr. Russ Warne

Q: What is your research focus? 

RW: Advanced academics (Advanced Placement, grade skipping, gifted education etc.) and human intelligence. 

Q: What current research/creative projects are you working on? 

RW: I’m wrapping up a project on grade skipping, and I am about to write another article on the AP program. I’m starting a project with the School of Education about the AP program. 

Q: What are your goals with these projects? 

RW: Articles, articles, articles. 

Q: What other research interests do you have? 

RW: Statistical procedures, research practices, and methodology. 

Q: What opportunities are available to UVU students who would like to get involved in research? 

RW: Some students may be able to help with the project I’m doing with the School of Education. It’s not clear when that starts and how many students I’ll be able to take on. 

Q: Currently, or in the near future, are you available to facilitate research opportunities with students? 

RW: Not until January 2017. Until then I’m focused on writing my stats textbook. 

Q: What advice do you have for undergraduate students? 

RW: Take as many courses from full-time faculty as you can.Building those relationships will give you the help you need to get into a good grad school.